Philosophy  RSS Feed

The Most Convincing Argument for Natural Rights

Thursday, April 17th, 2014 by posted in Law, Philosophy, Politics.

James E. Miller has sparked a debate on this blog about the biggest question in moral philosophy: is there a natural foundation for justice or are notions of right and wrong the product of human contrivance? That is a question

No comments yet

A Rebuttal on Natural Rights and Law

Tuesday, April 15th, 2014 by posted in Law, Philosophy.
sunny field

Indeed, when Gentiles, who do not have the law, do by nature things required by the law, they are a law for themselves, even though they do not have the law. They show that the requirements of the law are

No comments yet

The Source of Economic Progress–the Primacy of the Individual

Saturday, April 12th, 2014 by posted in Civil Liberties, Economics, Philosophy, Politics.

Members of an Austrian school of economics forum to which I belong have been discussing the source of economic progress.  It began with the usual elements of capital, technological development, and managerial expertise before getting more philosophical when a member

No comments yet

On Natural Rights, the Egoists Have Nothing

Monday, April 7th, 2014 by posted in Law, Philosophy.
Trevor Blake

The question of natural rights has bogged the thinking of philosophers for centuries. In a recent book review of Trevor Blake’s Confessions of a Failed Egoist and Other Essays, Nicholas James Pell brings up an interesting argument against the moral

6 comments

Enemy of the State, Friend of Liberty

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014 by posted in History, Philosophy, Politics.
cicero teaser

Reprinted from FEE.org Question: If you could go back in time and spend one hour in conversation with 10 people—each one separately and privately—whom would you choose? My list isn’t exactly the same from one day to the next, but

1 comment

Wonder and Liberty

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014 by posted in Law, Philosophy, Politics.
to the wonder

Reprinted from Lions of Liberty In Terrence Malek’s 2013 film “To the Wonder,” the recluse director attempts to share his spiritual vision of “wonder” with the audience. Known for his abstract messaging and visionary cinematography, Malek’s most recent flick garnered

No comments yet

How the Food Police Undermine Human Intentionality

Friday, March 28th, 2014 by posted in Philosophy, Regulation.
dont-eat

One of the key things that separates humans from animals is the ability to make plans and then act on those plans. That humans have intentions is the basis of all morality, economics, and law. As such, it is important

1 comment

Insanity and Human Action

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014 by posted in Law, Philosophy.
Dr. Thomas Szasz

I just finished reading Insanity: the Idea and Its Consequences by Thomas Szasz, the renowned libertarian psychiatrist. In it, he stresses the importance of human action, praxiology, and even takes Ludwig von Mises to task for falling into the trap

1 comment

Literature and Totalitarianism

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014 by posted in History, Law, Philosophy.
orwell tease

I said at the beginning of my first talk that this is not a critical age. It is an age of partisanship and not of detachment, an age in which it is especially difficult to see literary merit in a

No comments yet

The Meaning of Social Constructs

Friday, March 21st, 2014 by posted in Philosophy, Politics, Regulation.
Mussolini_mezzobusto

Imagine trying to debate the differences between cats and dogs with someone. But throw in one caveat: neither you nor your fellow debater know what a cat or dog is. Any kind of discussion on the playfulness of canines versus

No comments yet

Detlev Schlichter: Economics and the a priori: In defense of Ludwig von Mises

Wednesday, March 19th, 2014 by posted in Economics, Philosophy.
Detlev Schlichter: Economics and the a priori: In defense of Ludwig von Mises

On Tuesday 11th March, Detlev Schlichter gave a on “Economics and the a priori: In defense of Ludwig von Mises” to the Libertarian Alliance in London.

No comments yet

Why Conservatism Shouldn’t Be Ditched

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014 by posted in Philosophy, Politics.
Edmund-Burke-portrait-006

Conservatism is a dirty word. People often misuse it, whether speaking of themselves or others. It rarely means what it describes. Ask any man off the street what a conservative is, and they’ll likely tell you he is a bigoted

3 comments

What Academic Freedom?

Monday, March 10th, 2014 by posted in Education, Epistemology, Law.
academicfreedom

“Academic freedom” is one of those phrases that evokes little protest and little emotion. In fact, these days it has become pretty boring. The concept is taken purely at face value. In our liberal age, the open vetting of ideas

No comments yet

A Mental Barrier to Liberty?

Thursday, March 6th, 2014 by posted in Law, Philosophy.
Gears

Is it possible to convince others of the benefits of liberty? Can the mass-man ever be convinced that the state impedes on his own flourishing? I have my doubts. Government promises an escape from the drudgery of life. It also

No comments yet

Peter Boettke Interview

Wednesday, March 5th, 2014 by posted in Economics, History, Philosophy.
Opera-Vienna-Austria-2005 teaser

Reprinted from TheBestSchools.org Austrian economics, of course, is the school of thought which holds that the free market is basically self-regulating and that the government’s role should be limited to providing a reliable and predictable legal structure within which all

No comments yet

Episode 46 – Julie Borowski: Online Activism, Media vs. Libertarianism, and Drug Policy

Tuesday, March 4th, 2014 by posted in Philosophy, Politics.
julie

Catch one of the latest episodes of “Better Red Than Dead” with special guest libertarian personality Julie Borowski! You can listen here.  

No comments yet

The “Nation” as a Device To Create a Psychological Crowd

Friday, February 28th, 2014 by posted in Philosophy, Politics, Socialism.
canada teaser

Reprinted from LewRockwell.com One device of leadership is to control individual behavior by psychological means. Gustave Le Bon’s 1895 book “The Crowd: A Study of the Popular Mind” outlines this phenomenon. The leader uses events to short-circuit rational thought and regress people

No comments yet

Misunderstanding Machiavelli

Tuesday, February 25th, 2014 by posted in Capitalism, Economics, History, Philosophy, Politics.
machiavelli

An op-ed page discussion of Niccolo Machiavelli’s The Prince is the last place to expect another bit of carping about present-day inequalities of wealth. But that’s what the Toronto Star presented its readers today in a mini-symposium commemorating the 500th anniversary of

No comments yet

Stand Your Ground is About Rights, Not Race

Tuesday, February 25th, 2014 by posted in Law, Philosophy.
standyourground

There has been a lot of talk about so-called Stand Your Ground laws due to a number of a high profile legal cases that have captured the attention of the media. I am not particularly interested in getting into the

No comments yet

Mises and Schumpeter: Friendly Rivals?

Tuesday, February 18th, 2014 by posted in Economics, History, Philosophy.
pruckel teaser

Reprinted from Mises.org Ludwig von Mises and Joseph Schumpeter are the most famous economists trained by the older Austrian School, although generally Schumpeter has received the lion’s share of attention.[1] This is especially true, for example, in the field of entrepreneurship.

No comments yet